Tag Archives: sexually transmitted disease


With the pressure related to bringing up children and career having come to an end, it is time for many senior citizens to lead an active and emotionally fulfilling sexual life. Sadly some by this time have developed health conditions that at times interfere seriously with their sexual functions. Broadly speaking the greatest secret of better sexual health into old age is to do everything possible to keep physical, mental as well as emotional diseases at bay. More specifically, the following suggestions can help:

Treat your body well

Healthy diet

‘You are what you eat’ is a common saying when talking about health matters generally. This is true in regard to sexual matters. Eating healthy means that your body will remain healthy for long. The typical Western world diet increases the risk of obesity, heart diseases, diabetes and clogged vessels. A diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, healthy proteins, low sugars and refined foods as well as reasonable healthy fats and oils can help a person remain sexually active into old age. A good place to start is to see what is included in your country’s healthy ‘food pyramid’.


Lifestyle choices

Smoking and alcohol not only kill sex in the young but will be even more devastating in the old. Although a little alcohol may break sexual inhibitions, a little more may take away the ability. Long term uncontrolled intake also affects other systems such as the liver which is needed for healthy hormone metabolism among other functions that sustain good sexual health.


Sexually transmitted

Repeated STDs increase the risk of developing certain conditions that can negatively impact on sexual health later on in life. In the event of a sexually transmitted disease, early and effective treatment is recommended.


Positive attitude towards changes

Accepting inevitable changes that come with age and taking proactive action to remedy them can go a long way in maintaining healthy sex.  It is necessary to accept that with old age:

  • A man may take a little longer to achieve an erection strong enough for penetration. An understanding partner will be more patient and offer the needed extra stimulation to get things going.
  • Orgasm for both partners may be weaker and less frequent.
  • The vaginal lining becomes thinner and dryness may be an issue. Over the counter water soluble vaginal lubricant and a gentle partner is all that is needed to have satisfying sex free from friction pain and or bleeding.


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Sometimes it is inevitable for a senior to be on some medication for one health condition or another. Discuss with your doctor so that if possible, a drug that doesn’t trigger erectile dysfunction is prescribed.


Depending on a doctor’s assessment, sexual enhancement pills can be used. Viagra and Cialis are widely prescribed drugs that have helped many in that respect.

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Nutritional supplements

The world of nutritional supplements is full of products that are used for sexual health support. The concept behind using supplements is to help the body operate as it should. Herbal supplements are available for both men and women but caution is needed. Some herbs can interact negatively with prescription medicines and so it is important if you are on any medications to discuss with your doctor before taking them.

Finally for the purpose of this discussion, be as physically active as your circumstances allow.

Sexual dysfunction – Facts and Symptoms

It is difficult to establish the prevalence of sexual problems in the population because of the difficulties involved in carrying out surveys of people’s sexual behaviour. The commonest kinds of problems presenting to a sexual dysfunction clinic are,


Low sexual desire 50%

Orgasmic dysfunction 20%

Vaginismus 20%

Dyspareunia 5%


Erectile dysfunction 60%

Premature ejaculation 15%

Delayed ejaculation 5%

Low sexual desire 5%

The assessment of sexual dysfunction

Patients with sexual problems initially often complain about other symptoms because they feel too embarrassed to reveal a sexual problem directly. For example, a patient may ask for help with anxiety, depression, poor sleep, or gynaecological symptoms. It is therefore important to ask routinely a few questions about sexual functioning when assessing patients with non-specific psychological or physical symptoms.

In a full assessment, the interviewer should begin by explaining why it will be necessary to ask about intimate details of the patient’s sexual life, and should then ask questions in a sympathetic, matter-of-fact way.

Whenever possible both sexual partners should be interviewed, at first separately and then together.

The assessment should cover the following issues.

  • Has the problem been present from the first intercourse, or did it start after a period of normal sexual functioning? Each partner should be asked, separately, whether the same problem has occurred with another partner, or during masturbation.
  • The strength of sexual drive should be assessed in terms of the frequency of sexual arousal, intercourse, and masturbation. Motivation for treatment of sexual dysfunction should be assessed, starting with questions about who took the initiative in seeking treatment and for what reason.
  • Assess each partner’s social relationships with the other sex, with particular reference to shyness and social inhibition.
  • Enquiries should be made about the partners’ feelings for one another: partners who lack a mutual caring relationship are unlikely to achieve a fully satisfactory sexual relationship. Many couples say that their relationship problems result from their sexual problems, when the causal connection is really the reverse. Tactful questions should be asked about commitment to the partner and, when appropriate, about infidelity and fears of sexually transmitted disease, including HIV.
  • Assess sexual development and sexual experience, paying particular attention to experiences such as child abuse, incest, or sexual assault that may have caused lasting anxiety or disgust about sex.
  • Enquiry should be made about homosexual as well as heterosexual feelings.
  • In the medical history, the most relevant things to look for are previous and present psychiatric and chronic physical disorders and their treatment, pregnancy, childbirth, and abortion(s), and use of alcohol or drugs, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
  • In the mental state examination look especially for evidence of depressive disorder. Physical examination is important because physical illness often causes sexual problems Physical examination of women may require specialist gynaecological help. Further investigations may be necessary depending on the findings from the history and examination (e.g. if diabetes is suspected as a cause of sexual disorder).

Human Papillomavirus Related Diseases and Treatment

Human papillomavirus is a very common sexually transmitted disease, it is a DNA virus that can be found at the mucous membranes of the entire genital area as well as the mouth and throat. It has lots of subtypes. Some types are harmless. Other types (oncogenic types) may lead to cancers.

Have a look at the following descriptions. You can prevent these diseases if you do not get infected with human papillomavirus. Use condom when you have sex, and, most of all, get vaccinated against human papillomavirus!

Risk Factors of HPV

If your immune system is weak (after an illness), you have multiple children, you have been taking oral contraceptives for a long time or you have a chronic inflammation within the genital area, then you are more likely to get infected with HPV and develop cervical cancer.

HPV Related Diseases

Cervical Cancer

If you live with human papillomavirus, you are at risk of developing cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer has no symptoms. By the time it has symptoms (for example, you bleed between periods, sex is painful, you bleed after having sex, your period is unusually long or you have plenty of vaginal discharge), it is in an advanced stage. However, the disease does have warning signs: cancerous cells in the lining of your cervix. Only a health care provider is able to detect the subtle changes within your cells. Get tested! Pap tests or HPV DNA tests may save your life.

If the lab tests mean bad news, your health care provider will ask you to undergo further testing. Your doctor might want to a biopsy, a tissue sample from your cervix.

Cancer can spread to other organs within your body. Your doctor might suggest x-rays, MRI or CT scan.

Probably it is only your cervix that is affected, probably cancer has spread to the vagina, too.


There is no treatment available for human papillomavirus infection. On the other hand, doctors are able to heal related conditions like genital warts, precancerous lesions and – if detected early – cancers.

Precancerous cervical lesions can be treated by cryosurgery (freezing the cancerous cells); loop electrosurgical excision procedure which means your health care provider surgically removes the cancerous tissue with a hot wire loop; surgical conization i.e. removing a cone shaped part of tissue, using a laser, a scalpel or both of them; as well as laser vaporization conization.

You may undergo a surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or a therapy of the combination of the three. They may have side-effects.

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HPV Related Cancers and Treatment

HPV can lead to other types of cancer: vaginal cancer, penile cancer.

Doctors can treat these conditions with medication, chemotherapy, surgery, electrosurgery, cryosurgery or laser surgery – it depends on the type of cancer you have, your age, health, and the stage of the cancer. Your health care providers may want to remove the cancerous tissues, as much as possible.



Chlamydia is a very common sexually transmitted disease. Only in the United States, there are about one million chlamydia affected patients. It is a bacterial infection. Chlamydia has no symptoms and it can be cured easily, however, when untreated, it can cause severe sexual health issues and permanent damage in women, amongst others, genital and eye diseases. Chlamydia conjunctivitis or trachoma may cause blindness; it can spread by fingers or shared towels. Chlamydia, when left untreated, can make you prone to get HIV virus.

Chlamydia may lead to ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside of the uterus) that might be fatal.

If you are a sexually active woman under 25, you are at risk for chlamydia. If you get chlamydia while expecting a child, your baby can get infected, and it may lead to an eye infection or pneumonia. Get tested for chlamydia while you are pregnant.

Chlamydia is particularly dangerous for women, since it can spread to the womb and the fallopian tubes. It may lead to pelvic inflammatory disease. It is asymptomatic, at most, the affected woman will experience pain in her abdomen. However, it can damage her reproductive organs, it can cause infertility or ectopic pregnancy.

Straight, gay and bisexual men also should get tested for chlamydia, since they are at risk.

For men, chlamydia is less dangerous, but they can infect their female sex partners, so they should get tested and cured. It may happen that chlamydia leads to male infertility, but it is rare.

How to Prevent Chlamydia

Oral, vaginal and anal sex can infect you with chlamydia. Always use latex condoms or dental dams when having sex, and use them the right way. Even if you have never had chlamydia, you should get tested once in a while. If you are a woman, you are younger than 25 years old and you have one or more sex partners, you should get tested at least once a year.

Symptoms of Chlamydia

Chlamydia has no symptoms. When you start having symptoms, most certainly you have been infected for a while. However, while it has no symptoms, it still can lead to damages in the female reproductive organs. Vaginal bleeding, strange vaginal discharge or painful urinating can be red flags. In men, a discharge from penis, painful urination, and swollen testicles might be symptoms of chlamydia.

Treatment of Chlamydia

When you notice these symptoms, you should get a test for chlamydia. You are supposed to provide urine sample or samples from your vagina.

Chlamydia can be treated with antibiotics easily. However, you can get infected again. Your health care provider should monitor your health for several months. Your sexual partner should be cured, too. You should avoid having sex until you have finished your chlamydia treatment. If you were treated only once, you should wait a week with having sex.

Safe Contraception Options: Who Should Use Protection

Who should use protection, men or women? It is an interesting question. Sex, contraception options and protection are mutual responsibility. Both men and women should know how to choose the right method. Both of them should think about their own and their partner’s health and well-being. It is not enough if one partner is responsible: both parties should know how to prevent pregnancy. Safe sex is not a matter that you can shrug away, saying that your partner is on the pill and it is not your problem. Contraception pill may not solve sexual problem and not forget about the side effect.

Honesty, Trust, Contraception Options and Your Health

Is your partner honest with you? Does your female partner tell you that she takes birth control pills – and is it true? Probably she has side-thoughts and she thinks it is time to settle down and have a baby, so she has just “forgotten” about her birth control pills. Maybe she is the happy-go-lucky one and she has skipped one or two days, so now both of you are at risk of an unwanted pregnancy. Has your male partner told you that he has undergone vasectomy, so he is perfectly safe for you; but what about sexually transmitted diseases? Would your partner tell you if they had some minor infection? Do you know your partner well? Are you in a serious relationship, based on trust? Are you into one-night stands or short-lived relationships? These questions are not moral issues. They have a lot to do with your health. Never leave protection to your partner! Whatever he or she says, make sure that you do your best to avoid an unwanted pregnancy or an infection. Has he had a vasectomy? Is she on the pill? Great. You should still use protection. Combined contraception options are safe. If he did have a vasectomy, you still can take your birth control pills and ask him to use a condom.

Prevent Pregnancy: Choose the Right Method

While hormonal contraception is unbeatable when it comes to avoiding unwanted pregnancy, do not completely dismiss barrier methods. Condoms protect you from sexually transmitted diseases, and even some kind of cancers like cervical cancer.

Prefer male condoms over female condoms. Male condoms have a lowest failure rate of the barrier methods. Use a condom with spermicide. Never restrict your protection methods to female condoms alone! They have the highest failure rate of all birth control methods (with the exception of coitus interruptus, the withdrawal method). For instance, diaphragms are not reliable when you want to avoid pregnancy. Neither do they protect you from the diseases of the upper genital tract.

The safest way of having sex is when both partners use some kind of protection. For women, combined oral contraceptive pills, implants, combined injections, intrauterine devices are the safest methods, and, of course, the irreversible methods: hysterectomy, tubal ligation, and essure. They should also insist on using a condom. For men, vasectomy and lubricated latex condoms will be the safest way (make sure that you use water-based lubes and avoid oil-based lubes that may damage the condom). They can use plastic wrap when giving oral sex to their partner. Oral sex may seem safe, but it can lead to ugly surprises – for instance, human papilloma virus that can cause serious sexual health issues.

Common sexual issues a teenage girl faces

Teenage days look good, but come with its set of problems. Teenagers have to deal with the hormonal imbalances in their body which forces them to look good to the opposite sex and some other sexual problems. Teenaged girls have to deal with their sexual problems, but their mum can help them in dealing with it. Not all moms are free to talk to their daughters about sex and sexual issues.

Psychologists, time and again suggest that talking about sex and sexual habits to their teenage son and daughter would only do well than bad. Parents must understand that you are their first teacher and if you fail to educate them, they may end up screwing their lives or resort to internet to get their dose of information. Internet is a wide world in itself, so teenagers start finding something there and end with totally different page. Below are the few sexual problems and issues which teenaged girls usually face:

First time sex:

According to a survey, young girls have their first time when they are in their early teens. The results of this survey must have disappointing for many parents, but that’s not a big deal. World has become more modern and people are open about sex. The thing that parents must be concerned is to educate their young ones with the pros and cons of healthy sex life and the need to use protection.


If you are unlucky and not educated in sex then you end up having an unwanted pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy can be devastating. This is one major problem which gets sticky to deal with. Abortion is the only option left if you are very young, but it would have a bad impact on your body in the longer run. Parents must educate their kids with safe sex advices and young girls should insist on condoms if they are having sex.

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Sexually transmitted diseases:

When the hormones are at their highest peak, it becomes really difficult to control those desires to have sex. Some young girls end up having sex with infected strangers unknowing the consequences. Every young girl must know what sexually transmitted diseases are and how painful they are. Some sexually transmitted diseases are incurable and some are life threatening as well. Teenagers can refer to the internet to know some of the worst STD’s and also precautions that they must ensure while having sex.


Teenagers must be educated on different precaution methods so that they keep themselves safe from unwanted STD’s and pregnancies. It is important that the parents talk to their little ones on their own or seek the help of an experienced, qualified psychologist.

Teenage is a crucial age in life where the hormones control their lives. You cannot stop or control your young ones at this stage. They become rebellious and that could worsen the condition and also break the bond that you share with them. It is important to educate them so that they care of themselves. Teach them the right ways to keep them safe.

Tips For Practising Good Sex Health

You will be surprised at how few people out there practice good sex health. In fact, you may be surprised at just how preventable many of the sexual conditions that people suffer from actually are. On this page I want to give you a brief overview of the various things that you will need to do in order to ensure that you are practising good sexual health.

Firstly, a condom is a must. Unless you know your partner well, and you know that they are suffering from no problems, then you need a condom. A condom is the only contraceptive out there which is able to protect you from both sexual diseases and reduce the risk of pregnancy. If your partner refuses the use of a condom then do NOT have sex. The risks of something happening are far too high. It is worth noting at this point that there is no contraceptive out there which will eradicate sex health problems completely. There is always a slim chance that something can go wrong. However, you need to remember that there is more of a chance of something going wrong if you do not actually use the contraceptive to begin with!

I do not want to talk about the risk of pregnancy that much more. We all know that this is a massive risk when you are having sex. If you really do not want to have children then I suggest that you look into a few other methods that you can utilize. For example, a woman may want to use birth control pills in addition to a man using condoms. Two contraceptive methods are better than one after all!

The thing that I do want to talk about here when it comes to sex health is the chance of suffering from a sexually transmitted disease. What many people do not realize is that there are some sexual diseases e.g. Chlamydia which have absolutely no symptoms. However, they can cause some serious problems in your life. For example, they may end up making you infertile. This is why it is always important to practice good sex health.

Now, I am the type of person that would advocate that you ask people about their sexual history. Particularly if you have just met them and you are planning to have sex. Let’s be honest though, most people do not get themselves checked regularly (you really should, trust me, you are going to feel better in the long run!). People are also prone to lying. You should never rely on what somebody tells you. The only way in which you are going to stand a good chance of avoiding sexually transmitted diseases is by using a condom. There is no other contraceptive method out there which will actually work for you. You should always use condoms with somebody (even if they insist you don’t) until you feel comfortable with them and their sexual health. If you are entering a relationship then both of you may want to get checked out to give you confidence.